Y-3 Yohji Yamamoto
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White
  • Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White

Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress Black/White

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A two piece dress from the Y-3 Yohji Yamamoto SS13 Collection. Split into two parts, the main body of the dress features a sleeveless asymmetric design with crew neck. The skirt features an asymmetric, multi-layered 'can-can style' detailing around the back, with a cut-off finish. This is the perfect party dress for the Spring Summer season.

  • Y-3 Yohji Yamamoto
  • Y-3 Yohji Yamamoto SS13
  • Y-3 Yohji Yamamoto Two Piece Jersey Frill Dress
  • Two Piece
  • Body 88% Cotton, 12% Elastane. Inset 100% Cotton. Skirt 100% Cotton
  • Made in China

Celebrating a ten year collaboration with Adidas; Yohji Yamamoto, the design inspiration behind Y-3, presents to us his new Collection for Spring Summer 2013. The collection includes some favourite pieces from the past decade, whilst introducing newer but more fluid proportions and fits.

Rather than the simplicity of classic athletic wear, though, this collection is far more interested in the broader aesthetic palette of English youth culture – the iconographic patterns of Union Jacks, plaids and tartan, the sharp, graphic uniforms of the Mods, and the harshly dishevelled roughness of the punk-era.

Yohji Yamamoto has twisted and warped timeworn staples, into an austere but richly-layered collection full of drooping, unstructured silhouettes and fragmented patterns. Sheer over-layers darkened the vibrancy of tartan’s deep reds and greens, combining with the heaviness of black outerwear to provide a parallel echo with the aesthetics of another very different, quintessentially American youth scene – that of Nirvana’s early Nineties grunge.